Tag Archives: benefits of laughter

Social worker’s four-year drive to prove that laughter truly is the best medicine has finally brought her international recognition.

Dr Gita Suraj-Narayan, 56, and her daughter Sheroma, 26, from South Africa, received the IBN Tilmeez award for the best healthcare management research study at the combined 7th Annual Pan-Arab Critical Care Medicine Congress, 3rd Asia-Africa, World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine Conference and 7th Emirates Critical Care Conference in Dubai in April.

They researched the benefits of laughter therapy for stroke victims.

Their work has impressed the members of the social welfare department at Ryukoku University Junior College in Japan so much that they intend to use their techniques of laughter-yoga to help people deal with the shock of the recent earthquakes in Japan.

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Laughter Yoga helps with the pangs in a grief journey

Laugh for no reason? You just need to be willing to try. Participants in nurse  Patty Freier’s grief seminar at Childers Place had lost spouses, children, a brother or a sister and did just that. They got silly, dropped most inhibitions, let it go and gave themselves permission to laugh. “I liked it. I had one of those days where it was hard to stop crying, and I haven’t had one of those in awhile,” said Dianna Price after they were finished. “This was really good for me. Your mental outlook begins to change.”

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News: Australians Say We Love Laughter Yoga!

Sydney, Australia:  I walked into my first laughter yoga class expecting to see a hippie in a tie dyed shirt and leggings. I did not expect my yoga teacher to be a lawyer. And I certainly didn’t expect to be rolling around on the floor laughing with a bunch of people I’d never met before. But that’s exactly what happened.

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News: Cancer patients embrace laughter therapy sessions

Brenda Crook paws the air as she stands laughing with eyes wide open, her tongue out and a red foam ball pinching her nose. About 10 other clown-nosed people surround her and mimic the same “Lion Yoga Pose.” The image seems absurd, but Crook, 34, needs a little silliness in her life. She is battling breast cancer at Cancer Treatment Centers of America at the Western Regional Medical Center in Goodyear. She rarely gets to laugh freely. The CTCA is using a new type of therapy to help its patients: laughter.

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Laugh Out Loud! It’s Good For You.

Can one be happy and stay positive in such a stressful and challenging world? My friends and I regularly answer to the top of our lungs with an affirmative “yes!” at the end of every laughter session we have together, often times daily. We laugh for no particular reason except that of feeling happier and healthier. No joke.
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Relationships: homegrown laughter may be what ailing couples need most

Robert Provine, Ph.D., says that homegrown laughter may be what ailing couples need most. Uniquely human, laughter is, first and foremost, a social signal–it disappears when there is no audience, which may be as small as one other person–and it binds people together. It synchronizes the brains of speaker and listener so that they are emotionally attuned.
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