Tag Archives: tension

LOL: Why You Should Laugh Even When You Don’t Feel Like It

For family caregivers, the mountains of laundry, the endless messes that need cleaned up, the rushing to doctor’s appointments, the complete surrender of one’s personal life and the painful process of watching a loved one’s decline is no laughing matter. You may feel like crying more often than you feel like laughing.

But many experts say that laughing in even the grimmest situations is good for you, both mentally and physically. Laughter releases stress, strengthens the immune system, improves sleep, diffuses tension, reduces pain and boosts “happy chemistry.” Laughter is the nemesis of tension; you can’t hold on to tension when you laugh.

Read the full article here

Role of laughter in jury deliberations during a capital murder case: plays key roles in group communication and group dynamics

Laughter can play key roles in group communication and group dynamics — even when there’s nothing funny going on. That’s according to new research from North Carolina State University that examined the role of laughter in jury deliberations during a capital murder case. The researchers were given access to the full transcript of jury deliberations in the 2004 Ohio trial of Mark Ducic, a white male charged with two murders and 30 additional counts, largely related to drug violations.

Here is a summary of the research:

“Laughter is one way of dealing with ambiguity and tension in situations where a group is attempting to make consequential decisions and informal power dynamics are in play,” Keyton says. “There are very few opportunities to see group decision making, with major consequences, in a public setting,” Keyton explains. “It is usually done in private, such as in corporate board meetings or judicial proceedings. But laughter is something that occurs frequently, and not only because something is funny. Nobody in the jury was laughing at jokes.”

Read more at http://www.sciencedaily.com

Too much laughter = excess heart chi?

…Smiling is energetically very different from laughing. “Laughter is the best medicine” the saying goes, and laughing certainly releases tension and is good for the body in a number of different ways. According to Chinese medicine, if someone laughs too frequently or too loudly they may have excess heart chi and are unconsciously trying to release it. Laughter is more of belly centered emotional release than smiling.

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Why laughter can heal you: stress theory vs germ theory

There are two may theories when it comes to disease: the germ theory and the stress theory. The germ theory states that germs are the culprits that make you sick. The stress theory states that germs are already inside of you, in bigger and larger numbers that you’ll ever know.
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Way of the Inner Smile: does nothing, yet leaves nothing undone

I would encourage you to get the free Qigong eBook “Way of the Inner Smile” from http://www.healingdao.com/ (see top left of the page. You have to subscribe to their newsletter to get it). Very interesting. Here is a very short excerpt:

[…] The Tao sages in China are usually depicted as smiling. This is an Inner Smile, suggesting that no matter how bad the worldly burden becomes, the Tao within their inner heart will remain an eternal source of smiling joy. […] […] Smiling is energetically very different from laughing. “Laughter is the best medicine” the saying goes, and laughing certainly releases tension and is good for the body in a number of different ways. According to Chinese medicine, if someone laughs too frequently or too loudly they may have excess heart chi and are unconsciously trying to release it. Laughter is more of belly centered emotional release than smiling.

Smiling is more subtle than laughter, a more inward and more sustainable experience. Someone who smiles continuously is not considered in excess, assuming it is not a “phony” outer smile. Smiling is less about emotions, which are our response to outer life events, and more about subtle feeling. Inner Smiling cultivates this feeling to a high level, focusing on the spiritual joy that arises from our inner soul and radiates out as subtle presence.

Thanks to ancient Tao masters passing down their tradition for thousands of years, we now know the secret of the Inner Smile is hidden within our inner heart. The inner heart is not the physical heart, and it is not the emotional or feeling heart. There is a “third heart”, just as there is a “third eye”. This inner heart is a portal to direct experience of what is called “soul”, a concept in the West that has successfully eluded all definition.

The ancient enlightened masters gave us a very specific map of the Inner Smile’s pathway within our body. It arises like a wave from the inner ocean of our unknown and unborn self. Before it gently splashes onto the beach of the outer world, it passes through many subtle layers of body-mind consciousness that they mapped out in great detail. […]