laughter therapy

Social worker’s four-year drive to prove that laughter truly is the best medicine has finally brought her international recognition.

Dr Gita Suraj-Narayan, 56, and her daughter Sheroma, 26, from South Africa, have recently received international recognition for their research on the benefits of laughter therapy for stroke victims. Their work has impressed the members of the social welfare department at Ryukoku University Junior College in Japan so much that they intend to use their techniques of laughter-yoga to help people deal with the shock of the recent earthquakes in Japan.

Laughter Therapy Takes Off in South Korea

An hour of weekly laughter was good enough for Jung-Oak Lee, 64, to fight off depression that coincided with two years of chemotherapy to treat her colon cancer. Every Friday afternoon, she travels almost two hours to join about 100 other cancer patients and families in a packed hallway of Seoul National University Hospital, one of Korea's largest, to learn how to guffaw.

News: Healing Power Found in Laughter Yoga

Whitney Munro did not think that as a fitness specialist and mother she had to take a class just to learn how to laugh. But she signed up for laughter yoga class and second-guessed herself all the way to the American School of Laughter Yoga in Chicago. Two days later, she returned home exhilarated, eager and certified to teach laughter therapy to the seniors she helps at Fairview senior living community in Downers Grove, Illinois.

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